We never know how much we plug in until we realize a power outlet doesn’t exist where you need it. Perhaps you live in an older home or maybe you built a new one. There are electrical codes that your electrician has to follow but don’t be afraid to add more. Places like mudrooms, outside and in garages are just a few places you might want to consider adding some more power.

Power outlets in your mudroom

For an active family like mine, mudrooms are a necessity in our home. power outlet in mudroomA mudroom is the hub where backpacks, school gear, laundry and cleaning supplies are stashed. And since most are situated next to the garage, it gives you an easy in and out access. However, with the increase on our reliance of technology, I do recommend keeping the space functional too.

Think about how you can use the space to make your life easier. If you have space for your kids’ backpacks and coats, you have space for additional power. Add a shelf to that locker area and add a power outlet or USB port. This way, your kids’ items are all in one space and are ready as you head out the garage door versus the front door. Nothing derails a morning like looking for that missing phone or laptop. Now you have it charging and next to essential school gear.

Garage

If you have a garage and plan on using it just to park cars, think again. Tools always seem to find a way to incorporate themselves in the garage. I’m talking about the big tools like miter saws and air compressors. If you have these types of tools, plan on adding more outlets than normal. Put them on a separate circuit breaker and consider upgrading that circuit to 20 Amps versus the standard 15 Amps. Tools such as these tend to draw more power and nothing is more annoying than tripping that breaker and having to flip it every time you need to use it.

Outdoor power

If you tend to decorate your front lawn for holidays, you know extension cords are in your future. Why not limit the cords and put a power outlet in the yard in a flower bed? This avoids the crisscrossing of cords over your sidewalk and reducing tripping hazards. Make sure your décor is rated for outdoor power and be aware of other lines buried in your yard.

If you plan on hanging any lights along the roofline, consider getting a power outlet installed in the soffit. Make sure it is weather resistant and follows electrical codes. By adding this in your soffit, you avoid having to see the extension cord hanging down along the side of the house.

 

Power outlets can make your life easier. A certified electrician can help you calculate how much a circuit can handle based on the number of appliances, tools and lights. By thinking about how you plan on using the different areas of your home, you can always add more outlets where needed.